A Visualization of the World Trade


This is a graph of the worldwide trade by countries for years 1995 to 2011. Each chord between countries (or group of countries) represent the value of trade between those countries.

Amounts are given in millions of 2011 $USD. Click on a year to see the changes. You can also view the external trade network for a selected economic sector from the dropdown list. Scroll down past the graph for more details and credits.

The thickness of links (chords) encodes the relative size of trade: thicker links represent bigger trade amounts. Chords are sorted from largest to smallest within each country groups. Hover on the chords or regions arcs to show the relevant amounts.

Links are directed: for example, in the year 1995 (all economic sectors combined) Great-Britain exported $US54,064 M. to North American countries, while importing $US36,061 M. from them. Links take the color of the country (or group of countries, see lower) which have a trade surplus. Hover your pointer over the chords or over the circle to see trade amounts.

Data is from the World Input Output Database [1]. It represents an Input-output model at a worldwide scale. Each represented countries' matrix contains input and output for each economic sectors. Economic Input-Output Tables are generally available at a country level. This dataset attempted to show the interrelations of each economic sector of each countries with all other economic sectors, inside or outside those countries.

Here we attempt to graphically represent the global trade between the 40 countries (plus one entity standing for the rest of the world) included in the WIOT tables. For easier representation, those 40 countries have been reduced into 12 groups of countries --roughly similar as per geolocation or culture-- as follow:

  • Great Britain
  • Australia
  • Brazil
  • China and Taiwan
  • Germany
  • Europe, North and West countries (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Nederland, Malta, Portugal, Sweden, Slovakia, Spain)
  • Europe, South and East countries (Bulgaria, Czech, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Hungary, Lithuania, Latvia, Poland, Roumania, Slovenia)
  • France
  • India, Indonesia and Turkey
  • Japan and Korea
  • North America (Canada, United-States and Mexico)
  • Russia
  • The rest of the world.

By clicking on different years, one can observe the changes occurred during that time. For example, we can see that the proportion of trade from China and the countries represented in the rest of the world have substantially increased relative to the western countries.

We can also see, for example, that the group "China and Taiwan" started to be in trade deficit with the "rest of the world" after 3 years of trade surplus, by observing the change of color of the chord.

The graph have been made with d3js and is adapted from M. Bostock's, thanks to the excellent guidance from Amelia Bellamy-Royds.



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